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PURPOSE: The objective of the study was to compare patterns of survival 2001-2004 in prostate cancer patients from England, Norway and Sweden in relation to age and period of follow-up. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Excess mortality in men with prostate cancer was estimated using nation-wide cancer register data using a period approach for relative survival. 179,112 men in England, 23,192 in Norway and 59,697 in Sweden were included. RESULTS: In all age groups, England had the lowest survival, particularly so among men aged 80+. Overall age-standardised five-year survival was 76.4%, 80.3% and 83.0% for England, Norway and Sweden, respectively. The majority of the excess deaths in England were confined to the first year of follow-up. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that a small but important group of older patients present at a late stage and succumb early to their cancers, possibly in combination with severe comorbidity, and this situation is more common in England than in Norway or Sweden.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.canep.2011.08.001

Type

Journal article

Journal

Cancer Epidemiol

Publication Date

02/2012

Volume

36

Pages

e7 - 12

Keywords

Aged, Aged, 80 and over, England, Humans, Male, Mass Screening, Norway, Prostatic Neoplasms, Public Health Practice, Survival Rate, Sweden